SONG of the MONTH

 

"HUMBLE KING"

 

Words & Music by Charl Folscher (Every Nation, South Africa)

© 2017 Charl Folscher

 

SONG STORY

"I had a desire to write a song that was squarely aimed at God. A song that was filled with worship expression toward God without including us in the mix. What I mean with that is I wanted to have it devoid of expressions of what he did for us and write about who he is—his glory, majesty, power, and holiness without ‘Jesus saved my soul and he loves me so.’ There is, of course, nothing wrong with those expressions of gratitude about how he impacts our lives, but for this song I moved that aside. In the end the line, still You are the humble King, crept into the song which contrasts God's sovereignty with his chosen path of meekness. Now, of course, that hints at what he did for us. Go figure. I hope you guys enjoy." - Charl Folscher

To stay up-to-date on Charl's music, follow him on social media or check out the Humble King EP here.

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Downloads

Click the buttons to download the "Humble King" EP and Lyric Chart.

 

 
ABOUT CHARL: Charl has been the Pastor of Worship and Media Arts at In Focus Church for the past five years and is currently in the process of relocating back to South Africa. He is married to Elize Folscher and they have a six-month baby boy named Benjamin. Charl says, "I love Jesus and his church and I believe that the church in its local context is the hope of the world."

ABOUT CHARL:

Charl has been the Pastor of Worship and Media Arts at In Focus Church for the past five years and is currently in the process of relocating back to South Africa. He is married to Elize Folscher and they have a six-month baby boy named Benjamin. Charl says, "I love Jesus and his church and I believe that the church in its local context is the hope of the world."

ABOUT THE HUMBLE KING EP: The five songs on this EP follow a journey into God's sovereignty, holiness, power, and humility. It contrasts our mere humanity against his greatness, and also contrasts God's sovereignty with his own chosen path of meekness. We journey to a place of surrender, asking God for his mercy and grace to be overflowing toward us while moving us to faith and the ability to believe that his promises are true.  

ABOUT THE HUMBLE KING EP:

The five songs on this EP follow a journey into God's sovereignty, holiness, power, and humility. It contrasts our mere humanity against his greatness, and also contrasts God's sovereignty with his own chosen path of meekness. We journey to a place of surrender, asking God for his mercy and grace to be overflowing toward us while moving us to faith and the ability to believe that his promises are true.

 

3 Anchors of a Worshiper

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"Without God's Word as an anchor, we drift towards a truth we feel instead of the truth we know." –Pastor Daniel Stephens

In this podcast, Pastor Daniel explains how being anchored in salvation, God’s Word, and community produces authentic worship.

Pastor Daniel begins his sermon with the song of Moses in Exodus 15. He uses this chapter to explain what it looks like to be anchored in salvation. Listen to find out more . . .

Application Question

Out of the three anchors—treasuring salvation, studying God’s Word, and engaging in community—which area do you struggle with the most? What are some practical steps you can take this week?

 

 

Audio excerpt was recorded at the Burn Brighter Conference (Mid-Cities Church in Midland, Texas).

Music Referenced:

Listen to Beauty For Ashes (Hands to the Sky) 

Listen to Glory Rising (The Songs We Sing) 

 

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

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In January of 2006, Pastor Daniel Stephens was ordained as the Senior Pastor at Mid-Cities Community. In addition to being very active in the Midland/Odessa community, Daniel serves as a board member for Every Nation Ministries. Learn More. 

 

Without God’s Word as an anchor,
we drift towards a truth we feel
instead of the truth we know.
— Pastor Daniel Stephens

Discovering the Joy of Discipleship

By Alarice Thio

Pictured:  Every Nation Church Singapore Worship Team

Pictured:  Every Nation Church Singapore Worship Team

When I first sensed the calling of the Lord to pick up and move to Singapore from Australia, I was at a season in my life where I was desperately hungry for more of him. I had reached a “ceiling” in my faith where I desperately wanted to grow, go on an adventure with the Lord, and be part of community that encouraged a radical missional faith.

God answered that prayer. Soon enough, a door opened for me to come to Singapore, and it was at that point along my journey as a singer-songwriter, where the Lord connected me with a certain rapping Samoan Kiwi (a definite rare find in Asia) and his hysterical Filipino wife. We met and I was struck by how extremely loving and friendly they were, and discovered that they were the worship pastors of Every Nation Church Singapore. Not long after, I joined the worship ministry and began a season of my life of discovering the joy and value of discipleship.

Within our worship community, there are times of powerful encounters with the Holy Spirit, and then there are also times of powerful one-to-one discipleship moments, where the love of the Father is tangibly expressed through another person.  

 

Here are some of my thoughts on how discipleship within a worship community changed my life:  

 

 

  • Discipleship shouldn’t just be programmed-based, but should be done out of genuine love and care and by doing LIFE with the person.

  • Discipleship involves calling out the GREAT and also calling out the JUNK!  My biggest points of growth happen when someone shows me a mirror and lovingly speaks TRUTH to my heart. (Note: It’s important to have relationship with this person, so they know you truly love and care for them!)

  • Discipleship looks a lot like doing MEALS in each others’ houses. Much of deep friendship and bonds occur when you hear one another’s dreams, stand with each other in trials, and celebrate victories together over some great grub. It’s “off-stage” moments like these that forge the comradery for powerful “on-stage” moments leading worship together as a team!

  • Discipleship looks a lot like giving chances upon chances upon chances!  When I first started worship leading, there were moments of brain-freeze and not knowing where to take the set. Pastor Neli would smoothly step in and lead it to where we needed to go! Create an “I’ve got your back” culture as it gives people confidence to step out in faith and try again!  

 

 

When we pursue his presence together in a worship community, it’s not simply striking a few chords and singing a few solid notes — that could just be noise.  Worship overflows from the depth of intimacy we have with the Lord and the depth and unity of our worship community that is unlocked through discipleship.  

 

 

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Alarice is one of the worship leaders at Every Nation Church Singapore. She enjoys being part of the Every Nation worship community led by Pastor Ily Mark Maniano.  Together with her husband Calvin, they lead Awaken Generation — a worship mentorship school based in Singapore with the goal of raising up worship musicians and artists in both skill and character. (www.awakengeneration.sg)

 

Within our worship community, there are times of powerful encounters with the Holy Spirit, and then there are also times of powerful one-to-one discipleship moments, where the love of the Father is tangibly expressed through another person.
— Alarice Thio

WORSHIP, DISCIPLESHIP, & CHURCH HISTORY

Photo by Ryan Daly

Photo by Ryan Daly

By Pastor Steve Murrell

 

YOKOHAMA, JAPAN—Every year, our International Apostolic Team (IAT), which includes regional leaders from all over the Every Nation world, gathers together to fellowship, pray, and plan for the coming years (and even decades). Every Nation Church Yokohama hosted our 2017 IAT meeting.

One of our conversation topics last week was liturgy and how we can equip our pastors to think critically (and even creatively) about the relationship between worship and discipleship. Working as we do in so many different cultural contexts, we recognized the need to better equip our missionaries and church planters to think through how worship works in general and how it works in their particular context.

One of our starting points was a discussion about the role of different liturgical practices in church history.

When we look back through history, we find that though the core elements of Christian worship have remained consistent (fellowship, singing, preaching, communion, offering), different elements are emphasized at different times.

For example, in medieval Europe, the climax of the liturgy was communion. Services still featured singing, fellowship, preaching, and offering, but the greater emphasis was on the celebration of the Lord’s table. In Reformation Germany, the emphasis shifted back toward the preached word. Again, the other elements of Christian worship were still present, but the shape of Protestant liturgy emphasized the importance of the preaching. Fast forward another 500 years to the Charismatic movement of the 1960s and 70s. Though Charismatic churches valued the preached word and the celebration of communion, their worship services emphasized singing and experiencing God’s presence during longer worship.

Today, if you were to attend churches with roots in these three traditions, you would still notice the different points of emphasis in the worship. Though some people would argue that one worship tradition or style is better than another, it’s more helpful to realize that in every time and place, pastors and leaders have adjusted or emphasized elements of the liturgy in response to three impulses: missiological context, theological tradition, and practical necessity. Let’s look at those reasons.

 

1. Missiological Context. Medieval catholicism, for all its faults, emphasized certain very visual liturgical practices (like communion) because church leaders were communicating the gospel to highly illiterate European populations—many of whom (at least initially) did not speak the same language as their priests. Hence, the emphasis on communion, a highly visual liturgical practice that powerfully represents the core truths of the gospel to people who can’t read (or maybe can’t even understand the sermon).

 

2. Theological Tradition. Protestant churches during the Reformation, because of their theological emphasis on Sola Scriptura, felt that the preaching of the Word needed to be the main focus of corporate worship. Though they appreciated the ways that other liturgical practices, like communion, gave worshippers a visual representation of the gospel, they felt that the Word of God had too often been absent from medieval worship practices, resulting in disciples whose knowledge of the gospel was real but underdeveloped.

 

3. Practical Necessity. During the Charismatic movement, many pastors and leaders (who were part of mainline cessationist denominations) were kicked out of their churches for their insistence on the continuing work of the Holy Spirit. Thus, out of both practical necessity and a theological conviction about the continued work of the Holy Spirit in the life of the church, Charismatic churches—and their particular liturgy—were birthed. While valuing the preached word, this tradition places a great emphasis on sung worship, with the expectation that people will encounter the living God in profound and unique ways as we come into His presence with singing.

 

As you think about liturgy and your own missiological context, remember that worship is not primarily about what we can do for God; it is about what God does in us by the Holy Spirit as we gather in His presence.

 

This article has also appeared on ministrytoday.com. Read the original blog post at stevemurrell.com

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Steve Murrell serves as the president of Every Nation Churches and Ministries. Learn More

Steve Murrell serves as the president of Every Nation Churches and Ministries.

Learn More

As you think about liturgy and your own missiological context, remember that worship is not primarily about what we can do for God; it is about what God does in us by the Holy Spirit as we gather in His presence.
— Pastor Steve Murrell